The Montessori Curruculum

THE MONTESSORI CURRICULUM

At Rosemary Hall, our Montessori curriculum covers Practical Life, Sensorial Materials, Language, Mathematics and Culture.

Practical life

Dressing frames-each frame teaches one particular skill needed in dressing oneself; there are frames with buttons, snaps, zippers, buckles, laces, hooks, and eyes, pins and bowsThe focus “Practical Life” is to foster care of oneself and care of one’s environment. As the child progresses through Rosemary Hall, he learns self-mastery and independence, and an innate sense of grace and courtesy.

Practical Life Exercises also aid the growth and development of the child’s intellect and concentration and will in turn also help the child develop an orderly way of thinking.

Dressing frames-each frame teaches one particular skill needed in dressing oneself; there are frames with buttons, snaps, zippers, buckles, laces, hooks, and eyes, pins and bows.

 

Sensorial

Cylinder Blocks- there are four cylinder blocks with ten cylinders each; one set differs only in height, one only in diameter, and the other two in both height and diameter. Matching each cylinder to its proper hole teaches size discrimination and develps hand muscles to be used for writing.In “Sensorial” the child is encouraged to use his senses to explore the world around him. He studies his environment and through this study, begins to understand it.

Through work with the sensorial materials, the child is given the keys to classifying the things around him, which is the basis for a clear, conscious and structured understanding of the world around.

Cylinder Blocks- there are four cylinder blocks with ten cylinders each; one set differs only in height, one only in diameter, and the other two in both height and diameter. Matching each cylinder to its proper hole teaches size discrimination and develops hand muscles to be used for writing.


 

Language

Sandpaper Letters are mounted out to allow the child to learn the shape of each letter through touch and to associate the sound each letter makes with its shape.Because language is an intrinsic part of one’s thinking process, the child will need to be spoken to and listened to often. The child will need a broad exposure to language, with correct articulation, enunciation, and punctuation. The child will need to experience different modes of language and to hear and tell stories. Most importantly, the child needs to feel free and be encouraged to communicate with others. We will master the sounds of the alphabet, leading, at the child’s own pace, the ability to blend 2 and 3 letter sounds, leading up to the ability to read complete words. This is coupled with the tracing of letters to develop basic motor skills necessary for handling writing materials, and eventually, the understanding of the different parts of speech.

Sandpaper Letters are mounted out to allow the child to learn the shape of each letter through touch and to associate the
sound each letter makes with its shape.




 

Math

Some examples of our Math materialsThe focus of "Mathematics" in our Curriculum is to build up a mind of "exactity". The mathematical mind estimates, quantifies, and identifies similarities, differences and patterns to make order and create structure. Montessori activities call for precision so that the child can come into contact with isolated concepts (e.g "units" "hundreds" "thousands")? and through repetition, develop clear abstraction. These concepts help the child to order his mind.

Some examples of our Math materials




 

Cultural Studies

A Montessori education helps a child develop his own personality, adapt to his own culture, and become an independent, useful member of society. Through Cultural studies, the child acquires knowledge to this end, in the areas of biology, of biology (botany and zoology), geography, history and science.? We "interpret" the world for our children by bringing to them knowledge of the world, including that of people and places, animals and their habitats, and how the earth functions as part of the universe.

We add areas of music, art, dancing, sewing, sports and foreign languages to enrich the child’s total development.

The Montessori curriculum is non-graded and non-competitive, thus allowing the children to work and grow in an environment that permits their individual potential to reach its own level and at its own pace, without any negative or judgmental pressure.

 

Famous Montessori Graduates

On the Barbara Walters ABC-TV Special "The 10 Most Fascinating People Of 2004" Larry Page and Sergey Brin, founders of the popular Internet search engine Google.com, credited their years as Montessori students as a major factor behind their success. Having been friends since childhood, when Barbara Walters asked if the fact that their parents were college professors was a factor behind their success, they said no, that it was their going to a Montessori school where they learned to be self-directed and self-starters. They said that Montessori education allowed them to learn to think for themselves and gave them freedom to pursue their own interests.

It is quite an interesting collection of people throughout history who have gone to Montessori schools, sent their children to Montessori schools, or supported this method of education in one way or another. The list includes:

Alice Waters, Gwyneth Paltrow, Friedrich Hundertwasser, Julia Child, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Helen Keller, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Mahatma Gandhi, Sigmund Freud, Buckminster Fuller, Leo Tolstoy, Burtrand Russell, Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, John Holt, Ann Frank, the Dalai Lama, Jacqueline Kennedy, Prince William and Prince Harry of the English royal family, Cher Bono, Yul Brynner, Bill and Hillary Clinton, and Yo Yo Ma.